Carol sheriffs the artificial river essay

The book merits a wide readership. The Archbalds had considered moving to Ohio,but worried that the new territory was "at a great distance from markets The honor fell to Judge John Richardson, who had been awarded the first contract to build a section of the waterway.

Of special note is the exhaustive, but valuable, section on Notes and Sources located at the end of the text material. Synopsis The story of the Erie Canal is the story of industrial and economic progress between the War of and the Civil War.

Businessmens and enterprisers saw the Canal as an chance to do money. This presented a major job because the people in these towns had formed a life around the Canal and many of them made their income based of the Canal.

Whether the Canal was being used for concern people. Indeed, so quickly did the area along the canal become civilized that it was soon taken for granted and its annual winter closings were greeted not with stoic understanding, but annoyance -- like that which cell phone users experience when experiencing choppiness.

For examples, the State was asked continually to expand the canal system to include connecting canals to the main route; towns had developed along the original route, but some lost out when improvements to the Canal necessitated a shifting of the route to a new location; the level of tolls charged on products and passengers had to be settled upon; and the need to raise enough revenues to pay interest and principal on the Canal debt were topics of concern.

The Artificial River: The Erie Canal and The Paradox of Progress

This helped concern prosper and served as a positive facet for the Canal. Those who did venture beyond the Atlantic basin took advantage of several gaps left by the prehistoric collisions. Mary Ann Archbald, who emigrated from Scotland in with her husband and children, held such aspirations. The Canal provided dramatic alteration to the upstate New York country.

The Erie Canal provided an highly fast beginning of transit compared to other 1s of that clip. Richardson addressed the gathering, proclaiming, "By this great highway unborn millions will easily transport their surplus productions to the shores of the Atlantic, procure their supplies, and hold a useful and profitable intercourse with all the marine nations of the world.

Eventually, these problems encouraged travelers and commerce to seek an alternative — the railroad. Professor Sheriff has located and utilized the major available sources for this research effort. When the Canal was built it ruined early colonists belongings such as the Archbalds.

Wallace, author of Rockdale Review "The Artificial River is deeply researched, its arguments are both subtle and clear, and it is written with grace and an engagingly light touch.

Governor DeWitt Clinton leads the group and emphasizes on a more reliable and efficient transportation source, while at the same time developing culture along the way. There is little that I can quibble about.

Still, local interest in canals suggests that at least some settlers on the New York frontier shared an interest in commercial exchange and modernization. Not surprisingly, the business classes claimed to be contributing to the general welfare, whether it was the case or not.

Among the middle classes, these changes would be grouped together as signs of progress or improvement. Although it was true that the people could travel faster, safer, and more economically, a new innovation was slowly catching on.

InMary Ann Archbald tried to offer a sweeping picture of her new home to the acquaintances she left behind. There is no inquiry transit was faster and cheaper than any other beginning around that clip.

The size of the flock alone suggests that the Archbalds produced for the market and did not merely find themselves with an unplanned "surplus" of goods. At the clip anterior to constructing the Canal many negative impacts were the lone things being considered.

As correctly pointed out by Professor Sheriff, the expansion of internal improvements was one of the great changes occurring in the development of a more market-based economy. These towns would necessitate to be relocated in order to obey these new petitions.

She lives in Williamsburg, Virginia. Other settlers had more entrepreneurial goals; they concentrated on reducing their production costs while selling their goods as dearly as the market allowed. In addition, other manuscript collections at seventeen different locations in New York and New England were examined.

The Artificial River: The Erie Canal and the Paradox of Progress, 1817-1862

Johnson, The Journal of American History "A beautifully written and unpretentious book that reveals how little historians have known about something they have written so much about: Businesss thrived off these tourers and fledglings. Carol Sheriff, an historian at the College of William and Mary, differs in her treatment from standard accounts in that she is concerned primarily with the human dimensions of the development and evolution of this medium of transportation in upstate New York.

William claude dukenfields and cellars would be flooded. Business was non merely done on the Canal. In some instances this alteration resulted in prosperity and in others it resulted in failure and loss. Laurent Department of Economics University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Jerome Laurent is the author of several articles and papers on Great Lakes transportation history including:Read The Artificial River: The Erie Canal and The Paradox of Progress free essay and over 88, other research documents.

The Artificial River: The Erie Canal and The Paradox of Progress. The Artificial River The Erie Canal and the Paradox of Progress Carol Sheriff 6/12/ The Artificial River: The Erie /5(1).

The Artificial River: The Erie Canal and the Paradox of Progress, [Carol Sheriff] on ultimedescente.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The story of the Eric Canal is the story of industrial and economic progress between the War of and the Civil War.

The Artificial River reveals the human dimension of the story of the Erie Canal/5(25). THE ARTIFICIAL RIVER. The Erie Canal and the Paradox of Progress, by Carol Sheriff. BUY NOW FROM. AMAZON BARNES & NOBLE GET WEEKLY BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS: Email Address Subscribe Tweet.

KIRKUS REVIEW An enligihtening work of social history that makes a now familiar feature of the American landscape the focus of an exploration of 19th. The Artificial River has ratings and 14 reviews.

Tomijo said: More than just a local interest account of a famous public works project, the building /5. The Artificial River: The Erie Canal and the Paradox of Progress, / Edition 1 The story of the Eric Canal is the story of industrial and economic progress between the War of and the Civil ultimedescente.com: $ Carol Sheriff, The Artificial River: The Erie Canal and the Paradox of Progress, New York: Hill and Wang, xvii + pp.

$ (cloth), ISBN 0 4. Reviewed for ultimedescente.com by Jerome K. Laurent, Department of Economics, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. This slender volume of.

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