Analysis of the yellow wall paper

She describes it in romantic terms as an aristocratic estate or even a haunted house and wonders how they were able to afford it, and why the house Analysis of the yellow wall paper been empty for so long. She complains that her husband John, who is also her doctor, belittles both her illness and her thoughts and concerns in general.

The narrator is reduced to acting like a cross, petulant child, unable to stand up for herself without seeming unreasonable or disloyal.

She discovers a strange smudge mark on the paper, running all around the room, as if it had been rubbed by someone crawling against the wall. The narrator is alone most of the time and says that she has become almost fond of the wallpaper and that attempting to figure out its pattern has become her primary entertainment.

She mentions that she enjoys picturing people on the walkways around the house and that John always discourages such fantasies. She describes the color and pattern of the wallpaper in an assortment of distasteful ways.

She mentions that John is worried about her becoming fixated on it, and that he has even refused to repaper the room so as not to give in to her neurotic worries. When the story was first published, most readers took it as a scary tale about a woman in an extreme state of consciousness—a gripping, disturbing entertainment, but little more.

The narrator has no say in even the smallest details of her life, and she retreats into her obsessive fantasy, the only place she can retain some control and exercise the power of her mind.

She creeps endlessly around the room, smudging the wallpaper as she goes. After its rediscovery in the twentieth century, however, readings of the story have become more complex.

By the end, the narrator is hopelessly insane, convinced that there are many creeping women around and that she herself has come out of the wallpaper—that she herself is the trapped woman.

The narrator mentions that she, too, creeps around at times. When her husband unlocks the door and finds his wife and the room in these conditions, he is appalled. Nearly all of these critics acknowledge the story as a feminist text written in protest of the negligent treatment of women by a patriarchal society.

It was also adapted to film in a made-for-television production by the British Broadcasting Corporation. Weir Mitchell, the leading authority on this illness.

The next day she manages to be alone and goes into something of a frenzy, biting and tearing at the paper in order to free the trapped woman, whom she sees struggling from inside the pattern.

She and her husband John, who is a doctor, have rented a house in the country, in which she is to take a rest cure. The narrator becomes more obsessed with the wallpaper and begins to imagine that a woman is trapped behind it. The narrator sees her shaking the bars at night and creeping around during the day, when the woman is able to escape briefly.

Each time he does so, her disgusted fascination with the paper grows. As the first few weeks of the summer pass, the narrator becomes good at hiding her journal, and thus hiding her true thoughts from John. The yellow wallpaper itself becomes a symbol of this oppression to a woman who feels trapped in her roles as wife and mother.

Table of Contents Plot Overview The narrator begins her journal by marveling at the grandeur of the house and grounds her husband has taken for their summer vacation. Gilman implies that both forms of authority can be easily abused, even when the husband or doctor means to help.

As her obsession grows, the sub-pattern of the wallpaper becomes clearer. She also thinks back to her childhood, when she was able to work herself into a terror by imagining things in the dark. Weir, proponent of the rest cure treatment. All too often, the women who are the silent subjects of this authority are infantilized, or worse.

The Yellow Wallpaper Critical Essays

Gilman once stated that the rest cure itself nearly drove her insane. Her treatment requires that she do almost nothing active, and she is especially forbidden from working and writing. She contrasts his practical, rationalistic manner with her own imaginative, sensitive ways.“The Yellow Wallpaper” is an illustration of the way a mind that is already plagued with anxiety can deteriorate and begin to prey on itself when it is forced into inactivity and kept from healthy work.

The Yellow Wallpaper Analysis Literary Devices in The Yellow Wallpaper. Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory. It’s definitely not a coincidence that the woman in the wallpaper is trapped behind a pattern. We can conceive of societal norms and mores as types of patterns that metaphorically restrict our mo.

The Yellow Wallpaper Questions and Answers. The Question and Answer section for The Yellow Wallpaper is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel.

Front page illustration for the original serialized version of The Yellow Wallpaper from the New England Magazine ().

Students will be able to provide a well-supported analysis of how the narrator of "The Yellow Wall-paper" represents Gilman's feminism. Preparation Instructions. The Yellow Wallpaper study guide contains a biography of Charlotte Perkins Gilman, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

About The Yellow Wallpaper. The Yellow Wall-Paper Literary Analysis Charlotte Perkins Gilman uses her short story “The Yellow Wall-Paper” to show how women undergo oppression by gender roles. Gilman does so by taking the reader through the terrors of one woman’s changes in mental state.

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Analysis of the yellow wall paper
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